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Quincy, Washington
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August 11, 2011     The Quincy Valley Post-Register
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August 11, 2011
 

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A4 August 11, 2011 VALLEY FORUM !r POST-REGISTER A confession: we're not perfect Last week we had an article on the front page about a girl whowas bitten by a pit bull in Quincy. There was one aspect of the story that turned out to be more rumor than fact. We reported that it took two police officers to pull the dog off the girl. That part ended up being false. According to witnesses on the scene and further information from the Quincy Police Department, the pit bull had somehow managed to escape its cage and bit the girl on the arm. A member of the family that owns the dog was able to call it off the girl. The girl, who was visiting her neighbor's yard, was taken to the hospital by a member I N VI R SHOULD'VI PUT I VI RYTHING INTO TH F STOCK ARKI T! Ramble on ChuckAIlen of her family. She was being treated in the hos- pital when the police officers arrived on the scene and took the pit bull into custody. Why am I telling this story? Well, first off, I want to set the record straight and second, I want to use this situation to highlight the fact that news organizations don't always get things correct, especially when we are reporting on late-breaking events. While we do our best to try to verify our reporting and get all the details correct, there are times when we may be told something by someone who does not have the most accurate information. There are other times when we may hear something different than what we are told. We may make a typo that changes the meaning or mess up when we are taking a complex series of facts and trying to condense them into a story that can be understood by a wide audience. I can assure you that, at least with the Post-Register, these mistakes are unintentional and are not a part of some broad conspiracy to push some kind of agenda. The truth is that we are doing our best to get a newspaper to your mailbox every week with useful and informative information about your community. We really don't have the time to spin our coverage toward a certain point of view. Finally, if you do see a mistake in the paper, please let us know. We welcome the opportunity to make corrections. I KNOW TH' I PUTALL I HAD INTO STOCK -- AN' THI N TH' PRICI OF COWS COLLAPS'D! 'LI AST I CAN I AT/IAY STOCK... CORRESPONDENCE We need to face energy reality Americans live in an idealistic world where, no matter what happens, we'll still be able to go home at night and switch on the lights or pull into a filling station and gas up the family SUV. Most folks -- including many elected officials -- don't connect the dots. They somehow believe there are no consequences to killing a small biomass project in Vancouver, stopping a wind farm development because it spoils their view, taking a coal-fired plant off line, or opposing a natural gas or electric trans- mission line. There"s a smug attitude that we've always had all the energy we need, so we always will. Well, it ain't so! For example, the new president of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is a senior commander of Iran's Revolutionary Guards. Rostam Ghasemi, head of the Khatam al-Anbia military and industrial base, was appointed Iran's oil minister by President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. That automati- cally makes him the new head of OPEC, which has a crucial role in setting world crude oil prices. Ghasemi is currently subject to sanctions by the United States, European Union and Australia, and his assets have been blacklisted by U.S. Treasury and other western powers. OPEC is made up of a dozen oil- exporting nations, many of which aren't friendly to America. Between Algeria, Angola, Ecuador, Iran. Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates. and Venezuela, OPEC members collectively hold 79 percent of the world's crude oil reserves and 44 percent of the world's crude oil production, affording them considerable control over the global market. Why should we care? America still consumes nearly a quar- ter of the world's oil production, yet has just over 1 percent of the total proven oil reserves. So our nation is dependent upon others for oil, and whether we like it or not, we still use petroleum for fuel and millions of other products we use every day in our hospitals, school, factories and homes. President Obama and other elected officials need to get their heads out of the clouds, look around to see who our friends are and act accordingl),. Case in point: Canada has been our best friend and ally for hundreds of years. We've fought wars together, and our citi- zens are joined at the hip. Our economies are interconnected, and we cooperate daily on any number of issues. Canada is second to Saudi Arabia in proven oil reserves, but most of it is housed in the oil sands of northern Alberta. While some of the oil is mined, the majority of it will be extracted through pumping steam into deep wells and bringing the oil to the surface for refining. The Canadians have extensive invest- ments in environmental improvements, including water reclamation and conser- vation, and the Canadian government has adopted extensive pollution and greenhouse gas reduction programs. Yet, alternative energy activists want to stop oil sand development. But the fact is.even with energy conservation,mcreas- ing reliance on electric cars and hybrids and switching to natural gas-powered vehicles, America's demand for oil will continue to grow. So will that of China and other developing nations. We will continue to need oil for the foreseeable future. The only question is where we'll get it. Elected officials need to come to grips with the fact that by halting development of our proven oil reserves, delaying and killing energy projects, and snubbing our nose at Canadian suppliers, we will be placing our energy future and national security in the hands of OPEC and the head of Iran's Revolutionary Guard. Ironically, by controlling the energy that fuels our nation's economy, our en- emies could bring the United States to its knees without firing a shot. We had better get our heads out of the clouds, come down to earth and face reality before it's too late. - Don Brunell, President Association of Washington Business CALENDAR THURSDAY, AUGUST 11 Quincy Rotary Club - noon at the Quincy Senior Center, 522 F St. SE. Quincy Kiwanis Club - noon at Zack's Pizza, 704 F St. SW. Quincy Lions Club - 6 p.m. at Zack's Pizza. "Back to School" health carnival - 2 to 6 p.m. at Quincy Community Health Center, 1450 1st Ave. SW. FRIDAY, AUGUST 12 Alcoholics Anonymous - 8 p.m. at the Quincy Masonic Temple, 406 H St. SW. "Celebrate Recovery" - 7 to 9 p.m. at Faith Commu- nity Church worship center, across from the hospital, 10~ Ave. SW. "Brilliant Traces" - 8 p.m. at the Masquers Theater in Soap Lake. SATURDAY, AUGUST 13 George Community Farmer's Market - 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the George Commu- nity Park. Free Quincy bus tour "Wild Horse Wind Farm" -2 p.m., Quincy Community Center. Participants must sign waiver. "Brilliant Traces" - 8 p.m. at the Masquers Theater in Soap Lake. "Van's Warped Tour" - all day at the Gorge Amphithe- atre. SUNDAY, AUGUST 14 "Brilliant Traces" - 3 p.m. at the Masquers Theater in Soap Lake. MONDAY, AUGUST 15 TOPS meeting - 6 p.m. at the Quincy Senior Center. TUESDAY, AUGUST 16 Alcoholics Anonymous - 8 p.n~:~5 the Quincy Masonic Terhple,406 H St. SW. Quincy City Council meet- ing -- 7 13.m. at Quincy City Hall, 104 B St. SW. George City Council meet- ing - 7:30 p.m. at the George City Hall, 102 Richmond Ave. Grant County Fair - all day at the fairgrounds in Moses Lake. WEDNESDAY, AUG. 17 Grant County Fair - all day at the fairgrounds in Moses Lake. THURSDAY, AUGUST 18 Quincy Rotary Club - noon at the Quincy Senior Center, 522 F St. SE. Quincy Kiwanis Club - noon at Zack's Pizza, 704 F St. SW. Quincy Valley Lions Club - 6 p.m. at the Christian Reformed Church, 420 H St. SE. Grant County Fair - all day at the fairgrounds in Moses Lake. Kids bus tour to the fair - noon to 5:30 p.m. at the fairgrounds in Moses Lake. Must pre-register at Quincy Public Services Building. FRIDAY, AUGUST 19 Alcoholics Anonymous - 8 p.m. at the Quincy Masonic Temple, 406 H St. SW. "Celebrate Recovery" - 7 to 9 p.m. at Faith Commu- nity Church worship center, across from the hospital, 10th Ave. SW "Brilliant Traces" - 8 p.m. at the Masquers Theater in Soap Lake. Grant County Fair - all day at the fairgrounds in Moses Lake. Daddy/Daughter Luau - 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at The Grainery. Must pre-register. www.qtownrec.us. SATURDAY, AUGUST 20 George Community Farmer's Market - 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the George Commu- nity Park: Free Quincy bus tour "A World of Grapes" - leaves at 2 p.m. from the Quincy Community Center. "Battle of the Biz" dodge- bali tournament - 10 a.m. at the Lauzier Park tennis courts, Grant County Fair - all day at the fairgrounds in Moses Lake. Toby Keith - 7 p.m. at the Gorge Amphitheatre. SUNDAY, AUGUST 21 Community prayer service - 6 p.m. at GCFD No. 3 Sta: tion, t201 Central Ave. S. "Worship in the Park" - 10 a.m. at East Park. "Brilliant Traces" - 3 p.m. ,at the MasCluers" Theater !n Soap Lake. MONDAY, AuGUsT 22 TOPS meeting -- 6 p.m. at the Quincy Senior Center. Quincy Valley Hospital board meeting - 5"30 p.m. at Quincy Valley Medical Center, 908 10th Ave. SW. Farmer-Consumer Aware- ness Day meeting - 7 p.m. at the Masonic Temple, 406 H St. SW. Free Balloon Animals in the Park - 10 to 11 a.m. at North Park. Must pre-register. www.qtownrec.us. TUESDAY, AUGUST 23 Alcoholics Anonymous - 8 p.m. at the Quincy Masonic Temple, 406 H St. SW. Quincy School District board meeting - 5:30 p.m. at the district office, 119 J St. SW. THURSDAY, AUGUST 25 Quincy Rotary Club - noon at the Quincy Senior Center, 522 F St. SE. What do you think? Send letters to the editor to editor@qvpr.com, P.O. Box 217 Quincy WA 98848, fax them to 787-2682, or drop off 840 F St. SW. Where to Write In Olympia: Gov. Christine Gregoire Legislative Building Olympia, WA 98504 Senator Janea Holmquist 109A Irv Newhouse Bldg P.O. Box 40413 Olympia, WA 98504-0413 Dist. 13 Representatives Bill Hinkle 206 John L. (3'Brian Bldg p.o. Box 40600 Olympia, WA 98504 Judy Warnick 421 John L. O'Brian Bldg P.O. Box 40600 Olympia, WA 98504 In Washington D.C.: Senator Patty Murray 173 Russell Senate Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 Senator Maria Cantwell 464 Russell Senate Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 Representative Dec Hastings 1323 Longworth House Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20515-4704